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English

National Curriculum - English

Guide to National Expectations in SpellingGuide to National Expectations in Spelling

Guide to National Expectations in Spelling


HandwritingHandwritingHandwriting

The aim of our teaching is to develop the children’s ability to read, write and speak fluently, to listen and to develop the skills of grammar, spelling and handwriting. We hope also to encourage their love of the spoken and written word through books, poetry, drama and other communication media. English for the most part is delivered through the Literacy Strategy, but also linked to other relevant learning.

  • Our Literacy Curriculum follows the "National Curriculum Guidance". 
  • In addition, we follow "Letters and Sounds" for Phonics teaching and the County rolling programme for spellings.
  • In reading we use "Book Bands" which take from a variety of schemes -e.g. Oxford Reading Tree, Ginn, Scholastic, Heinemann and other non-scheme books.
  • For SEN we use "Rapid Reads" by Heinemann and Wolf Hill.

 

Download the reading booklet for parentsDownload the reading booklet for parentsReading booklet for parents

 

Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 (Years 1 and 2)

Children are taught to read using a variety of strategies. The learning of a sight vocabulary is accompanied by the structured learning of phonics, and the development of the child’s use of contextual and syntactic clues. Vital too in our approach to reading is the encouragement of pleasure and joy in books. The children’s understanding of text is also developed through discussion and questioning. They have a carefully balanced programme of reading, which is targeted to their need. The school provides a weekly programme of guided reading and shared reading, which is reinforced by a home reading programme.

Written language also begins here, with a gradual development of a predominantly spoken language to the ability to write independently in a structured and purposeful way. Children are taught to use their phonic knowledge to spell words. They also learn the spelling of a range of high frequency words as stated in the Literacy Strategy. Pupils are taught to write both fiction and non-fiction, and also to compose for a variety of purposes and audiences. A wide variety of experience is given in speaking, and they are exposed to oral language in many styles through different media.

Lower Key Stage 2 (Year 3 and 4)

Reading development progresses as children develop the ability to read independently and for sustained periods of time. In the same way as it applies in Key Stage 1, the children’s reading entitlement is balanced to need. Emphasis moves to the development of the understanding of a wider variety of texts. Again reading for pleasure and the introduction of a wide selection of books is a vital part of the approach.

The grammar and phonic learning continues. Children are taught to vary the structure of their sentences and to continue to increase the range of their vocabulary. Spellings are required to be learned, and this is tested regularly. Again children’s experience of texts and medias of communication, written and oral, continues.

Upper Key Stage 2 (Year 5 and 6)

Reading continues to be developed to include higher order reading skills, where greater emphasis is placed on inference and deduction. Reading for understanding, skimming, scanning, précis, note taking, combining information from various texts, making references or supporting a view are all important features of the upper KS 2 reading. Time is given for reading for pleasure and the experience of a wide variety of media.

Children are taught to write in a variety of styles and for differing purposes and audiences, using a rich and varied vocabulary. Spelling patterns continue to be taught and monitored in daily sessions, while the skills of grammar are further developed within the context of written work. We hope to provide many experiences where children can develop their spoken fluency and ability to communicate independently in many situations.

 

Reading Book Bands Explained

 

                     
Pink Red Yellow Blue Green Orange Turquoise Purple Gold White Lime Rainbow

 

Pink book band

For children just starting to read. Children are getting used to reading from left to right and matching spoken words to written words. Usually no more than 10 pages with up to 5 words on a page.

Pink A

Aligned to Phase 2 Letters and Sounds

  • Locate title
  • Open front cover
  • Turn pages appropriately
  • Understand that left page comes before right
  • Understand that we read from left to right
  • Use meaning together with repeated language patterns (syntax) to predict the storyline
  • Match spoken word to written word
  • Use a few known words to assist own reading

Pink B

Aligned to Phase 2 Letters and Sounds

 

  • Locate title, open front cover, turn pages appropriately
  • Understand that left page comes before right
  • Use meaning together with repeated language patterns (syntax) and some letters to read simple text
  • Match spoken word to written word (1:1 correspondence)
  • Use a few known words to check own reading
  • Read a simple CVC word in the text from left to right

Red book band

The second step up the ladder as children gain a little more confidence and may know some words by sight. Usually no more than 15 pages with 1 sentence per page.

Aligned approximately with Phase 3 Letters and Sounds

  • Locate and recall title
  • Consolidate secure control of one-to-one matching on a wide range of texts
  • Use known words to check and confirm reading
  • Solve simple CVC words by blending phonemes from left to right and check for meaning and correct syntax, ie, does it make sense and sound right?
  • Start to read more rhythmically or use phrasing while maintaining track of text
  • Repeat words, phrases or sentences to check , confirm or modify own reading

Yellow book band

Children are beginning to read more varied sentence structures and taking some note of punctuation. Usually no more than 15 pages with 1 or 2 sentences per page.

Aligned with Phases 3/ 4 of Letters and Sounds

 

  • Follow print with eyes, finger pointing only at points of difficulty
  • Take more note of punctuation to support the use of grammar and oral language rhythms
  • Cross-check all sources of information more quickly while reading
  • Note familiar words and phonemes and use these to help with reading of unknown words
  • Search for information in print to predict, confirm or attempt new words while reading
  • Notice relationships between one text and another
  • Predict in more detail

Blue book band

Children are becoming more confident at reading longer and more varied sentences. Usually no more than 15 pages with 2 or 3 sentences per page.


Aligned with Phases 4/ 5 of Letters and Sounds

 

  • Move through text attending to meaning, print and sentence structure flexibly
  • Self-correct more rapidly on the run
  • Re-read to enhance phrasing and clarify precise meaning
  • Solve new words using print information and understanding of the text to try alternative pronunciations
  • Identify constituent parts of unfamiliar words to read correctly
  • Manage a greater range of text genre
  • Discuss content of the text in a manner which indicates precise meaning

 

Green book band

Children are starting to read quite fluently and take note of punctuation. Usually about 20 pages with 3 or 4 sentences per page.

Aligned with Phase 5 of Letters and Sounds

  • Read fluently with attention to punctuation
  • Solve new words using print detail while attending to meaning and syntax
  • Track visually additional lines of print without difficulty
  • Discuss and interpret character and plot more fully
  • Use contents page and glossary in non-fiction books and locate information

 

Orange book band

Children are starting to read longer and more complex sentences and can understand a range of punctuation. Usually about 20 pages with 4 or 5 sentences per page.

Aligned with Phases 5/ 6 of Letters and Sounds

  • Get started on fiction after briefer introductions without relying on illustrations
  • Examine non-fiction layout and use the contents  page to select which sections of a book to read
  • Read longer phrases and more complex sentences
  • Attend to a range of punctuation
  • Blend phonemes in unfamiliar words more fluently, cross checking with meaning and syntax
  • Search for and use familiar syllables within words to read longer words
  • Infer meaning from text, check information in text with illustrations, particularly non-fiction, and comment on content
  • Begin to use appropriate terminology when discussing different types of text

 

Turquoise book band

Children can read complex sentences fairly fluently, taking note of punctuation. They use expression and do not rely on illustrations to help them. Usually about 20 pages with 4 or 5 sentences per page.

Aligned with Phases 5/ 6 of Letters and Sounds

  • Extract meaning from the text while reading with less dependence on illustrations
  • Approach different genres with increasing flexibility
  • Use punctuation and layout to read with a greater range of expression and control
  • Sustain reading through longer sentence structures and paragraphs
  • Tackle a higher ratio of more complex words using known vocabulary, phonic knowledge and syllables
  • Find a way around alphabetically ordered texts such as indexes, glossaries and dictionaries


Purple book band

Children might read silently or quietly at quite a rapid pace, taking note of punctuation. Usually about 25 pages with 5 to 10 sentences per page.
Aligned with Phase 6 of Letters and Sounds

  • Look through a variety of texts with growing independence to predict content, layout and story development
  • Read silently or quietly at a more rapid  pace, taking note of punctuation and using it to keep track of longer sentences
  • Solve most unfamiliar words on the run by blending long vowel phonemes, recognising and using them in longer and more complex words
  • Adapt to fiction, non-fiction or poetic language with growing flexibility
  • Take a more conscious account of literary effects used by fiction writers, and the formal language of different types of non-fiction
  • Begin to make more conscious use of reading to extend speaking and writing vocabulary and syntax

 

Gold book band

Children might read silently or quietly at quite a rapid pace, taking note of punctuation. Usually about 25 pages with 5 to 10 sentences per page.

Aligned with Phase 6 of Letters and Sounds

  • Look through a variety of books with growing independence to predict content and story development, and make full use of non-fiction layout
  • Read silently or quietly at a more rapid pace, taking note of punctuation and using it to keep track of longer sentences
  • Solve most unfamiliar words on the run by blending long vowel phonemes, recognising and using them in longer and more complex words
  • Adapt to fiction, non-fiction and poetic language with growing flexibility
  • Take a more conscious account of literary effects used by writers
  • Make more conscious use of reading to extend speaking and writing vocabulary and syntax
  • locate and interpret information in non-fiction

White book band

Books might have chapters. Children will read silently most of the time. They are interested in longer texts which they can return to easily after a break. Usually no more than 30 pages and about 10 sentences per page.

Letters and Sounds Phases cease to be relevant

  • Read silently most of the time
  • Sustain interest in longer texts, returning to it easily after a break
  • Use text more fully as a reference and as a model
  • Search for and find information in texts more flexibly
  • Notice the spelling of unfamiliar words and relate to known words
  • Show increased awareness of vocabulary and precise meaning
  • Express reasoned opinions about what is read and compare texts 
  • Offer and discuss interpretations of text
  • Comment on main characters and how they relate to each other
  • Suggest alternatives or extensions to events and actions
  • Discuss feelings created by stories
  • Retelling of stories is balanced and clear

Lime book band

Books might have chapters. Children will read silently most of the time. They are interested in longer texts which they can return to easily after a break. Usually more than 30 pages.

  • Begin to read reflectively and to perceive meanings beyond the literal
  • Refer to text to support own ideas
  • Distinguish main points from examples; fact from opinion
  • Devise key questions and words for searching and use several sources
  • Begin to read in different ways for different purposes, e.g. skimming for relevance, scanning for specific details, reflective and recursive reading for fuller comprehension
  • Compare/contrast work from more than one source
  • Read aloud with expression and intonation taking account of punctuation
  • Pupils can refer to text layout and organisation 
  • Pupils show some awareness of the point of view of the author
  • Beginning to sustain narrative and investigative reading

Rainbow and Free Readers

Books might have chapters. Children read silently with confidence and perseverance. A wide variety of longer, demanding texts, usually with around 30 - 50 pages.

Learning opportunities:

  • Sustain confidence and perseverance when reading longer, demanding texts
  • Begin to use deduction and inference with more mature fiction and poetry
  • Begin to perceive how an author develops: plot, characters, meanings beyond the literal, figurative language
  • Distinguish fact from opinion, point from example, relevant from irrelevant
  • Select key points of a text and summarise
  • Can refer to the impact of structure and organisation of texts
  • Can refer to text to explain their views
  • Identify themes
  • Identify impact of word choices
  • Secure the skills of skimming and scanning and recursive reading
  • Pupils can identify the purpose of a text